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medschoolsb:

theunpopopinions:

medschoolsb:

gadaboutgreen:

siddharthasmama:

auntada:

“I was born March 23, 1850 in Kentucky, somewhere near Louisville. I am goin’ on 88 years right now. (1937). I was brought to Missouri when I was six months old, along with my mama, who was a slave owned by a man named Shaw, who had allotted her to a man named Jimmie Graves, who came to Missouri to live with his daughter Emily Graves Crowdes. I always lived with Emily Crowdes.”
The matter of allotment was confusing to the interviewer and Aunt Sally endeavored to explain.
“Yes’m. Allotted? Yes’m. I’m goin’ to explain that, ” she replied. “You see there was slave traders in those days, jes’ like you got horse and mule an’ auto traders now. They bought and sold slaves and hired ‘em out. Yes’m, rented ‘em out. Allotted means somethin’ like hired out. But the slave never got no wages. That all went to the master. The man they was allotted to paid the master.”
“I was never sold. My mama was sold only once, but she was hired out many times. Yes’m when a slave was allotted, somebody made a down payment and gave a mortgage for the rest. A chattel mortgage… .”
“Allotments made a lot of grief for the slaves,” Aunt Sally asserted. “We left my papa in Kentucky, ‘cause he was allotted to another man. My papa never knew where my mama went, an’ my mama never knew where papa went.” Aunt Sally paused a moment, then went on bitterly. “They never wanted mama to know, ‘cause they knowed she would never marry so long she knew where he was. Our master wanted her to marry again and raise more children to be slaves. They never wanted mama to know where papa was, an’ she never did,” sighed Aunt Sally.
Sarah Frances Shaw Graves, Age 87
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938
Library of Congress, Digital ID mesnp 100126

the bold breaks my heart. this is what gave rise to the capitalism we know today. this is cruel.

I want people to know this wasn’t a long time ago. This was one or two generations ago.

WOW!

My grandmother was born in 1944. This really isn’t that long ago. Someone pointed out to me the other day that black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

“black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.”
I’ve heard this before too….smh


This is - for every person who lives in America - a necessary read.

medschoolsb:

theunpopopinions:

medschoolsb:

gadaboutgreen:

siddharthasmama:

auntada:

“I was born March 23, 1850 in Kentucky, somewhere near Louisville. I am goin’ on 88 years right now. (1937). I was brought to Missouri when I was six months old, along with my mama, who was a slave owned by a man named Shaw, who had allotted her to a man named Jimmie Graves, who came to Missouri to live with his daughter Emily Graves Crowdes. I always lived with Emily Crowdes.”

The matter of allotment was confusing to the interviewer and Aunt Sally endeavored to explain.

“Yes’m. Allotted? Yes’m. I’m goin’ to explain that, ” she replied. “You see there was slave traders in those days, jes’ like you got horse and mule an’ auto traders now. They bought and sold slaves and hired ‘em out. Yes’m, rented ‘em out. Allotted means somethin’ like hired out. But the slave never got no wages. That all went to the master. The man they was allotted to paid the master.”

“I was never sold. My mama was sold only once, but she was hired out many times. Yes’m when a slave was allotted, somebody made a down payment and gave a mortgage for the rest. A chattel mortgage… .”

“Allotments made a lot of grief for the slaves,” Aunt Sally asserted. “We left my papa in Kentucky, ‘cause he was allotted to another man. My papa never knew where my mama went, an’ my mama never knew where papa went.” Aunt Sally paused a moment, then went on bitterly. “They never wanted mama to know, ‘cause they knowed she would never marry so long she knew where he was. Our master wanted her to marry again and raise more children to be slaves. They never wanted mama to know where papa was, an’ she never did,” sighed Aunt Sally.

Sarah Frances Shaw Graves, Age 87

Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers’ Project, 1936-1938

Library of Congress, Digital ID mesnp 100126

the bold breaks my heart. this is what gave rise to the capitalism we know today. this is cruel.

I want people to know this wasn’t a long time ago. This was one or two generations ago.

WOW!

My grandmother was born in 1944. This really isn’t that long ago. Someone pointed out to me the other day that black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

black Americans don’t have/aren’t ‘old money’ because they were the money, the commodity. Very humbling.

I’ve heard this before too….smh

This is - for every person who lives in America - a necessary read.

(Source: heytoyourmamanem, via the-art-of--wishing)

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africaisdonesuffering:

Call to Action: #AskThem234
In response to the failings of a corrupt government, Nigerian citizens took to social media to voice their outrage and to demand more from their elected officials. From that outcry, Abuja based attorney, Ibrahim M Abdullahi, created the #BringBackOurGirls hashtag. From that single demand, an international social campaign to raise awareness began. Thanks to the brave Nigerians on the ground willing to ask questions, and deliver those answers to the rest of the world, we are able to learn more about the situation on the ground. As a result of that activism, the United States has sent troops over to assist with the search. Other nation states like China, the UK and France have also committed their assistance to the search.
In the spirit of the Nigerians who began this campaign, Rise Africa challenges you to think not just of the innocent girls stolen from their families, or those who have died in the two Nyanya Abuja bombings. Think also of those who you might never have heard of: the young men slaughtered in their dormitories as they studied to make their families proud, of the bridegroom whose story of love ended in death, for the young women whose names you will never know, whose faces you will never see, who have been stolen and sold into marriages they did not ask for, and for the other nameless victims of the Boko Haram agenda.
We ask you this week to challenge the current narrative, to resist the urge to treat this like a singular occurrence and to ask questions that examine the landscape from afar. In a nation rich in resources, with some of the wealthiest individuals in the world, why has a silent war been waged for almost ten years without government action? Why has that war escalated such that the international community stands at attention watching as the chaos and upheaval drive a nation towards violent a tipping point?
Join us this week as we ask the questions that few are asking. Help us capture the attention of Nigerian politicians on both sides of the debate and examine the role that government has played in the tragedies Nigerian citizens have been forced to endure.  Follow the discussion at #AskThem234
Monday: Ohimai Amaize a.k.a Mr fix Nigeria, the former special adviser to Bolaji Abdullahi, the sacked ex-minister of sports, @MrFixNigeriaTuesday: Nasir El-Rufai, former Minister of the FCT, leader of the new APC party @elrufaiWednesday: Patrick Obahigbon | @PObahiagbonThursday: Presidential Spokesman, Reuben Abati | @abati1990
Be sure to join us this Saturday May, 17th at 12:15 PM ET for our live #AskThem234 Google Hangout as we conclude this campaign and examine the actions of elected Nigerian government officials.
Connect with us through social media for more information: Twitter | Facebook | Tumblr

I LOVE THIS. America, you really want to #bringbackourgirls? Get involved.

africaisdonesuffering:

Call to Action: #AskThem234

In response to the failings of a corrupt government, Nigerian citizens took to social media to voice their outrage and to demand more from their elected officials. From that outcry, Abuja based attorney, Ibrahim M Abdullahi, created the #BringBackOurGirls hashtag. From that single demand, an international social campaign to raise awareness began. Thanks to the brave Nigerians on the ground willing to ask questions, and deliver those answers to the rest of the world, we are able to learn more about the situation on the ground. As a result of that activism, the United States has sent troops over to assist with the search. Other nation states like China, the UK and France have also committed their assistance to the search.

In the spirit of the Nigerians who began this campaign, Rise Africa challenges you to think not just of the innocent girls stolen from their families, or those who have died in the two Nyanya Abuja bombings. Think also of those who you might never have heard of: the young men slaughtered in their dormitories as they studied to make their families proud, of the bridegroom whose story of love ended in death, for the young women whose names you will never know, whose faces you will never see, who have been stolen and sold into marriages they did not ask for, and for the other nameless victims of the Boko Haram agenda.

We ask you this week to challenge the current narrative, to resist the urge to treat this like a singular occurrence and to ask questions that examine the landscape from afar. In a nation rich in resources, with some of the wealthiest individuals in the world, why has a silent war been waged for almost ten years without government action? Why has that war escalated such that the international community stands at attention watching as the chaos and upheaval drive a nation towards violent a tipping point?

Join us this week as we ask the questions that few are asking. Help us capture the attention of Nigerian politicians on both sides of the debate and examine the role that government has played in the tragedies Nigerian citizens have been forced to endure.  Follow the discussion at #AskThem234

Monday: Ohimai Amaize a.k.a Mr fix Nigeria, the former special adviser to Bolaji Abdullahi, the sacked ex-minister of sports, @MrFixNigeria
Tuesday: Nasir El-Rufai, former Minister of the FCT, leader of the new APC party @elrufai
Wednesday: Patrick Obahigbon | @PObahiagbon
Thursday: Presidential Spokesman, Reuben Abati | @abati1990

Be sure to join us this Saturday May, 17th at 12:15 PM ET for our live #AskThem234 Google Hangout as we conclude this campaign and examine the actions of elected Nigerian government officials.

Connect with us through social media for more information: Twitter | Facebook Tumblr

I LOVE THIS. America, you really want to #bringbackourgirls? Get involved.

(via monochromaticblack)

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teapayne:

take a moment to realize you have never seen your face in person, just reflections and pictures

Wow.

(via mylahhester)

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My Body, A Temple

My Body is the Holiest of Temples
Possessing in it
The Power of a Soul
Unbridled
Caressing in its gaze
The Possibility
Of All Climactic Change
Of Ethereal Successes
Of an Unmasked Beauty 
Ne’er Seen Before its time.

My Body is the Holiest of Temples
And for its diligence to my being
I give it praise.

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alexandraelle:

You cannot build anything great nor beautiful in the midst of fear. Thank you for this post, fellow writer @robhillsr.

True story.

alexandraelle:

You cannot build anything great nor beautiful in the midst of fear. Thank you for this post, fellow writer @robhillsr.

True story.

(via s3diya)

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(null)

Life is hilarious, saddening, and confusing. All at the same time.

Text

Ruler of Her Kingdom

She wears a cloak made of sadness,
Carries a scepter full of tears,
Totes a crown filled with madness,
And sits upon a throne of fears.

Ruler of her kingdom,
She sits amongst her peers.
An empire of no one
Brought to nought despite the years.

Text

Conflicted

My thoughts leave me
Conflicted.

Mental misgivings
Of a life barely lived
A sitch barely owned
A love barely had
Confusion entwined in the
Ribbons of race and the
Trappings of space that can
Barely contain my
Emotional
Confusion.

My thoughts leave me
Conflicted.

As I sit and I wonder
Should I stay or I go?
While time ticks asunder
And my pile of work grows.
Still my heart
Ever beating,
My mind
Ever teeming
Runs up and down paths
With no merit to show.

My thoughts leave me
Conflicted.
And it’s all I can do
Not to scream to the sky
Or throw a few blows
Or helplessly cry
If only
If only
If only
If only
It helps me stop being
Conflicted.

Quote
"Today, I’d like to remind you to take everything one step at a time. Display an authentic iteration of yourself proudly and gracefully to the world, and then, do not worry. Whatever is meant to be, will be, at it’s good and appointed time. Release control, pain, and anger. Allow life to happen, let God be God, and lastly, enjoy the ride."

— A Poetic Soul

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The life you live is based off of the picture you’ve drawn for yourself. Even mistakes made can turn into a masterpiece.

zodiaccity:

Be great!

(Source: zodiaccity)